D800 Diary - Week 2

I have had the D800 for 2 weeks now and it is a week since my last post.  I have managed to do some landscape photography - but not managed to get the light necessary for any amazing shots.  You can click on most of the images for a high res photo in Flickr (you need to go to the size view in Flickr though)

Twisted Tree
Twisted Tree

Twisted Tree - Nikkor 24-70 @ 24mm - ISO 125 F/8 1/500s (Handheld)

I still love the D800 - after 1 week here are some of the things I have found.

It is ok to handhold and shoot.  The twisted tree is handheld (albeit 1/500s @ 24mm).  The are a lot of people saying you get blurred shots and it is unforgiving.  Basically - it is the same as any other camera - but you may not get the absolute best resolution and may struggle if you print to A2 and look at the photo from 6" away!  You do need to be careful though when shooting at around 1/60s and slower on a tripod and always used mirror lock up and a remote shutter release.  The mirror does create a lot of vibration that does lead to a lose of high resolution detail.

The battery life is really really good.  I used the camera for 3 days and shot over 1000 images and about 10 movies continuously using the screen and still had 15% left.

So far I haven"t got any dirt on the sensor (a massive problem with the onlinecasinocanada1 D200).  I have been counting the number of times I have changed lenses - it now stands at 159 (sad I know!).

The auto image rotation doesn"t seem to work correctly - I have noticed when taking in portrait mode on a tripod it is fine when first comes up on view finder - then shows in landscape rather than portrait.

Editing the photos isn"t too bad - I have used a ipad (see my blog from a few weeks ago on the iPad apps I use >>) and Aperture and not had any issues at all.  Yes, it takes a while to transfer them to the iPad and they take a lot of room - but I have mostly shot RAW and never had a problem.  For reference , I have an iPad 3.

Morning light on Derwent
Morning light on Derwent

Morning light in Borrowdale - Nikkor 24-70mm f/8 1/20s ISO 50 (Heavy crop from original - edited on iPad)

I don"t care what anybody says - having the resolution (as long as you have good lenses) means you can crop more and compose different shots.  The shot below is a heavy crop of an original I took.  The sky wasn"t great and the image that was interesting was this crop.  You could still print this at a push at A3.

Buttermere Trees
Buttermere Trees

Buttermere Trees - Nikkor 24-70mm

View_to_keswick_585
View_to_keswick_585

View towards Keswick - Nikkor 24-70 @ 50mm ISO 50 1/15s F/8

Finally - here is a fun shot I spotted whilst walking up Catbells - again handheld.  The full resolution shot is crisp and you can actually see a lot of detail in the people.  View more shots from my Lakes trip on Flickr >>

ridge_walkers_585
ridge_walkers_585

Ridge walkers - Nikkor 24-70mm @70mm 1/800s